Indonesia cattle permits delay live export vessels for sale

Indonesia cattle permits delay live export vessels for sale

July 1, 2014

The Jakarta Post

KATU – Indonesia's new government has proposed that the national fleet of six commercial fish fishing vessels owned by the State Department of Fisheries and Oceans should temporarily cease shipping live stocks of fish for export.The proposed rule, issued late this month, has sparked protests from the Ministry of Fisheries and Oceans and is expected to lead to an investigation in Jakarta this fall and eventual enforcement against the company operating the vessels, which includes the State Department's Bureau of Fisheries, Fisheries Regulation and Enforcement (BFS).The proposal, which comes in response to a government request for information, will affect five commercial vessels already operating along the country's southern waters.The proposed ban means that live fishing fish from Indonesia's southern waters will not be allowed to be exported within 180 days of the end of January, and that the vessels may be required to stop operating. The Ministry of Fisheries and Oceans has called for an investigation of each commercial fish vessel operating in Indonesia's southern waters at any time during the 180-day suspension period.While the proposed ban may not be an outright ban on co우리카지노mmercial fishing, it is an attempt to protect the livelihood of Indonesia's hundreds of thousands of people who live and work in the country's fishing-rich southern seas. The move is a blow to environmentalists, who have long opposed commercial fishing. Indonesia is known for its strict enforcement of fish and wildlife regulations, and the proposed ban marks the second time in as many months that an Indonesian government has proposed to ban live-catch fishing of live, unripe fish on public lands.In a separate announcement last week, a stajarvees.comte-funded environmental NGO estimated that more than 60 percent of the fish harvested in Indonesia are dead.The new regulation could face fierce opposition from the seafood trade.The International Center for Animal Welfare (ICAW) said in a statement that the proposed ban could hurt the livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people across the world, including about 1.3 million of Indonesia's 8 million, and would threaten fish farmers and aquaculture.The ICAW has been calling for a moratorium on commercial fishing since 2002. Since then, in addition to a number of recent global fisheries conflicts and losses of wild animal populations, the numb바카라er of fish and birds killed globally in aquaculture has skyrocketed.Indonesia's seafood population is projected to be approximately 1.3 million tons by the year 2050 from about 1.1 million tons in 2000.The fish industry is estimated to have more than $