Seals frontier live export ships resume to vietnam stuart kemp/The Guardian

Seals frontier live export ships resume to vietnam stuart kemp/The Guardian

The next time a US Navy ship sails into the sea, the next time it sails into any Australian port, it will probably have the same destination as the rest of the US fleet — and some of the same US servicemen. The USS George Washington was recently dispatched to assist in the fight against a piracy fleet operating off the southern Indian coast of India바카라 that has been responsible for over 700 deaths this year.

The US Navy's top general, Admiral Harry Harris, was on the USS George Washington last September when an American commando struck a boat packed with nearly 100 mostly Chinese nationals at gunpoint, killing 23 passengers and crew. A US navy captain is currently in바카라 court over that crime.

In March, a crew of six US sailors were accused of looting a Chinese seafood processor that the US accused was responsible for a series of deadly incidents during the first week of September.

There is no doubt that the Obama administration has been trying hard to keep its war with North Korea from taking off in earnest.

In the coming months, in its war against Isis, the US military is trying to make clear that US bases are the only place in the world, anywhere in the world, in which America's wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been effective. For the Pentagon, that makes perfect sense, and even though the Isis situation is relatively minor, US forces in Iraq and Syria are far from the only places that are fighting for freedom against radical groups.

That might be why the Australian defence department is considering buying four additional Harrier F/A JAS-39 Super Hornets, each capable of supporting up to 17 squadrons of the US Navy at any one time, and i바카라사이트t is why the US is also considering buying 18 additional F/A JAS-39G "Surgical Strike Hawkeye" stealth fighter jets from the company, Lockheed Martin.

If the US army is interested in sending more of its best fighter jets — especially at a time when Australia's army has a deficit of five JAS-39s — there are other options.

In the Australian case, the US army is not the only interested party. The French navy is preparing for combat. The US will eventually have to sell Australia one of its most advanced surveillance and combat helicopters; a single AH-64 Apache from China. And the US could, in theory, also supply Australia more combat planes and, like the US Navy, the US defence department might need to keep a close eye on all potential foreign sources o